Discover coral reefs

Hawaiicoral.org is your premier destination to learn all about Hawaiʻi’s 1200 miles of coral reefs and how to help protect them. Our Ko‘a Corps unites citizen scientists like you with local research scientists and government agencies to ensure a holistic approach to reef conservation and action. Please join our inclusive community and help secure a promising future for these vital ecosystems.

Are Coral Reefs Bleaching in your area?

Help our scientists mitigate secondary stress to vulnerable reefs by reporting coral bleaching using our interactive tool.

The coral classroom

Coral class is in session!
We’ve curated the best reef resources available to help you learn all about coral reef ecosystems.

What is Coral Disease?

What is Coral Disease?

Bryant Grady, Graduate Student Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science at Arizona State University  Dive in with this episode's guest, Bryant Grady. Nicknamed the underwater doctor, Bryant is a graduate student at the Center for Global Discovery and...

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What is the Role of Herbivores in Coral Reefs?

What is the Role of Herbivores in Coral Reefs?

Chris Teague, Aquatic biologist Hawaiʻi Division of Aquatic Resources  Join Chris Teague under the waves of South Kona to explore the interconnectedness of reef herbivores and coral reef ecosystems. You will be introduced to finger coral, lobe coral and the four...

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How do corals get their color?

How do corals get their color?

Robin Martin, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science at Arizona State University  Take a dive along Hawaii’s beautiful Kona Coast on the Big Island with Dr. Robin Martin, Associate Professor at ASU, to learn how corals get their...

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Explore our Coral Maps

See Hawaiʻi’s reefs as you never have before with cutting-edge technology.

Outreach and Publications

GDCS NEWS

ASU center announces Hawaii coral reef conservation program

Media coverage

A map to saving coral reefs: the Allen Coral Atlas projects

outreach

Rapid repeat monitoring of reef threats.

gdcs news

asu center announces hawaii coral reef conservation program

Media coverage

A map to saving coral reefs: the Allen Coral Atlas projects

outreach

Rapid repeat monitoring of reef threats.

Instagram gallery

Did you know that juvenile coral are the foundation of coral reefs? Juvenile coral’s ability to settle and establish new coral reef is essential to the health of our marine ecosystem. @Asnerlab graduate student , Rachel Carlson, is currently analyzing 320 limestone tiles that she placed throughout South Kona’s reefs. Comparing the coral growth from different locations will give us a better understanding of what promotes young coral’s settling ability. 

📸Rachel Carlson

Did you know that juvenile coral are the foundation of coral reefs? Juvenile coral’s ability to settle and establish new coral reef is essential to the health of our marine ecosystem. @Asnerlab graduate student , Rachel Carlson, is currently analyzing 320 limestone tiles that she placed throughout South Kona’s reefs. Comparing the coral growth from different locations will give us a better understanding of what promotes young coral’s settling ability.

📸Rachel Carlson
...

Using reef-safe sunscreen every time you get into the ocean is a great way to protect our coral reefs! Make sure to check your sunscreen’s label when buying a new bottle, or using an old one.

Using reef-safe sunscreen every time you get into the ocean is a great way to protect our coral reefs! Make sure to check your sunscreen’s label when buying a new bottle, or using an old one. ...

Did you know that green sea turtles are essential to the health of Hawaii’s reef ecosystems? Green sea turtles are part of a small group of large herbivores that consistently graze reefs. Green sea turtle’s grazing helps to keep Hawaii’s coral reefs alive and healthy. Unfortunately, green sea turtles are an endangered species. A smaller green sea turtle population means a more vulnerable marine ecosystem. 

How can you help? Reducing ocean trash, keeping your distance from green sea turtles, protecting green sea turtle habitat, and reporting marine life in distress are all valuable ways that you can make a positive impact on the sea turtle population. 

📸 Gaby Barathieu / Ocean Image Bank

Did you know that green sea turtles are essential to the health of Hawaii’s reef ecosystems? Green sea turtles are part of a small group of large herbivores that consistently graze reefs. Green sea turtle’s grazing helps to keep Hawaii’s coral reefs alive and healthy. Unfortunately, green sea turtles are an endangered species. A smaller green sea turtle population means a more vulnerable marine ecosystem.

How can you help? Reducing ocean trash, keeping your distance from green sea turtles, protecting green sea turtle habitat, and reporting marine life in distress are all valuable ways that you can make a positive impact on the sea turtle population.

📸 Gaby Barathieu / Ocean Image Bank
...

With rapidly decreasing fisheries and increasingly vulnerable ecosystems, the future of the ocean is fragile. Pressures from growing populations, unsustainable harvest, loss of traditional practices, and warming seas have led to a continued loss of Hawaii’s marine resources.

In response to this loss, the State of Hawaii launched the Sustainable Hawaiʻi Initiative. As part of this effort, the Department of Land and Natural Resources committed to effectively managing Hawaiʻi’s nearshore waters with 30% established as marine management areas by 2030. Led by Hawaiʻi’s Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR), the Marine 30×30 Initiative will focus on developing and strengthening the essential components of effective management, including the development of a resilient marine-managed area network; statewide fisheries rules; outreach and enforcement strategies; monitoring; and restoration.

📸 Kimberly Jeffries/ Ocean Image Bank

With rapidly decreasing fisheries and increasingly vulnerable ecosystems, the future of the ocean is fragile. Pressures from growing populations, unsustainable harvest, loss of traditional practices, and warming seas have led to a continued loss of Hawaii’s marine resources.

In response to this loss, the State of Hawaii launched the Sustainable Hawaiʻi Initiative. As part of this effort, the Department of Land and Natural Resources committed to effectively managing Hawaiʻi’s nearshore waters with 30% established as marine management areas by 2030. Led by Hawaiʻi’s Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR), the Marine 30×30 Initiative will focus on developing and strengthening the essential components of effective management, including the development of a resilient marine-managed area network; statewide fisheries rules; outreach and enforcement strategies; monitoring; and restoration.

📸 Kimberly Jeffries/ Ocean Image Bank
...

Coral bleaching can be caused by increased ocean temperature, runoff and population, overexposure to sunlight, and extreme low tides.  During bleaching coral expels the algae living in their tissue turning them white. The loss of algae makes corals more vulnerable to disease and is detrimental to our marine ecosystems. 

Do you know of bleaching near you? See the video above for an example of how to report bleaching (region used as an example, not an accurate depiction of Hawaii coral bleaching) Report it at hawaiicoral.org!

Coral bleaching can be caused by increased ocean temperature, runoff and population, overexposure to sunlight, and extreme low tides.  During bleaching coral expels the algae living in their tissue turning them white. The loss of algae makes corals more vulnerable to disease and is detrimental to our marine ecosystems.

Do you know of bleaching near you? See the video above for an example of how to report bleaching (region used as an example, not an accurate depiction of Hawaii coral bleaching) Report it at hawaiicoral.org!
...

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